Lighting the Street:

Making it work:

Showing it off:

Ask the lamp

for more info.

Interactive Lantern.

This lantern has as much information on the inside as it does on the outside. The Design Museum Boston created an exhibit and in place of placards for each piece used a lantern instead. Passerby could log into each lantern using their phones and access more information about every designer. As an incentive, people who log in could also play with the light of the lantern, and if enough people logged in at once, all of the lanterns would play a light show.

 

This project was funded by:

Design Museum Boston

 

This project was showcased in:

Fort Point, Boston MA

 

My contribution:

Research

R&D Prototyping

Exhibit

This project focused on creating technology that would bring life and usability into a lantern in a completely new way. The result was an excellent incentive for people to interact with their surroundings, and a way to measure those interactions.

 

The technology itself could be implemented across any fixture and add a new level of accessibility between people and data. This idea could be easily used by a store front to track when the most amount of people show up, or any number of metrics.

Before showing it off in Fort Point, Boston, a proof of concept fixture was put up in a local LED lighting company. The design used a commercially available light that was heavily modified to be able to house the additional parts. The light used an internal 2 way communication system that could "listen" to outside input while also "telling" a separate server different internal analytics.

 

The whole thing had to be bluetooth enabled, support many people logging in at once, record data, and most importantly: withstand Northeast weather.

A mini exhibit was displayed on the floor of the LED company. It displayed all of the parts inside the modified fixture as well as a light up wall along with the actual lantern. Any employee could use their cellphone to play with the light and create various lighting effects on the wall, which would also translate over to the lantern. The lantern itself was designed to safely conceal all electronics, as well as withstand the weather conditions in Boston Harbor. It was unveiled to the public in the Street Seat Design exhibit in 2012.

Y.Z

Y.Z

Ask the lamp

for more info.

Interactive Lantern.

This lantern has as much information on the inside as it does on the outside. The Design Museum Boston created an exhibit and in place of placards for each piece used a lantern instead. Passerby could log into each lantern using their phones and access more information about every designer. As an incentive, people who log in could also play with the light of the lantern, and if enough people logged in at once, all of the lanterns would play a light show.

 

This project was funded by:

Design Museum Boston

 

This project was showcased in:

Fort Point, Boston MA

 

My contribution:

Research

R&D Prototyping

Exhibit

Lighting the Street:

This project focused on creating technology that would bring life and usability into a lantern in a completely new way. The result was an excellent incentive for people to interact with their surroundings, and a way to measure those interactions.

 

The technology itself could be implemented across any fixture and add a new level of accessibility between people and data. This idea could be easily used by a store front to track when the most amount of people show up, or any number of metrics.

Making it work:

Before showing it off in Fort Point, Boston, a proof of concept fixture was put up in a local LED lighting company. The design used a commercially available light that was heavily modified to be able to house the additional parts. The light used an internal 2 way communication system that could "listen" to outside input while also "telling" a separate server different internal analytics.

 

The whole thing had to be bluetooth enabled, support many people logging in at once, record data, and most importantly: withstand Northeast weather.

Showing it off:

A mini exhibit was displayed on the floor of the LED company. It displayed all of the parts inside the modified fixture as well as a light up wall along with the actual lantern. Any employee could use their cellphone to play with the light and create various lighting effects on the wall, which would also translate over to the lantern. The lantern itself was designed to safely conceal all electronics, as well as withstand the weather conditions in Boston Harbor. It was unveiled to the public in the Street Seat Design exhibit in 2012.