Enter the Takabisha:

Design in Zero G:

Force to be reckoned with:

Coasters make you

Color Blind.

GForce Analysis.

You are in a meeting. In fact, you just made a really impressive point. And now you are leaning back in your chair reveling in how completely original that insight was. Leaning back, leaning back. Your heels leave the floor. Leaning even further. You're only on your toes, leaning back.

 

Now, dear reader reading this article, you know exactly what's about to happen and already probably have a preemptive feeling deep down in your gut. That near-death experience that that person is about to undergo via tilting chair is called weightlessness. At best, you feel your organs shifting around. At worst, the change in pressure in your head makes your eyes stop registering color. It's actually pretty interesting, considering astronauts and jet fighter pilots experience that as a job. There is also this one guy who built a roller coaster to not just get you weightless, but actually in zero G.

 

What does zero G mean?

Let's talk about it!

This is a writing sample examining the design of an inverted roller coaster and using the experience of riding it to explain "G Force" and  it's effects.

My contribution:

Research

Writing

Between Tokyo Drift and giant robots, Japan is a place that has a very loving attitude towards adrenaline and thrill. In that fashion, Hiro Tamagatchi created a $36 million roller coaster that is so steep that it's actually the steepest on the entire planet, or at least according to the people in the Guinness Book of World Records. The ride starts, going from 0 to 62.1 mph in 2 seconds (which is faster than any Ferrari), and swiftly flips around loop after loop for a total of 7 inversions. At this point, while the human brain is trying to unscramble those numbers, the ride flies up to a height of a 14 story building, and drops at an angle of 121 degrees. Careful readers will note that this in fact more than 90 degrees, and yes, it drops upside down, and when it does, everyone gets a few seconds in zero gravity.

Hiro Tamagatchi has carefully measured out the design and made it so that the angle and speed at which the car enters the drop allow the rider to experience “near zero-g.” This means that riding on this roller coaster you can experience weightlessness. This happens when your movement cancels out gravity. So technically gravity is still there but you don't feel it anymore. Not counting NASA’s “Vomit Comet” which is primarily available to only astronauts, this is the only ride available that lets you experience zero gravity one moment, and then the crush of acceleration the next.

 

 

Although the effect is miraculous, Mr. Tamagatchi has created the roller coaster using simple concepts. The Takabisha is a steel roller coaster that uses linear motors and a rail system to drive the cars. This is similar to how a train is driven down a track. Although the linear motors apply the initial oomph, as well as carry individual cars up the slope to the top of the roller coaster, the main driving force is gravity. The roller coaster "falls" along the entire track. This is the important part to understand: even though the ride is moving because of gravity, instead of falling down, the ride is guided in a different direction by the track. This is what you feel.

 

 

The force that pins you back when the ride shoots off, and pushes you into your seat when you fly through an upside down turn are all caused by gravity. Or more accurately, the force created when your body is going in a direction other than where gravity wants you to go, otherwise known as g-force. Although g-forces act all around you, everywhere, they are mainly prevalent during moments of extreme acceleration when the g-forces increase to more the 2G.

 

The Takabisha is considered a “High G” roller coaster, and during the crux of an inversion, a rider will undergo 4G, which are similar conditions to what a fighter pilot feels in a jet plane. It's also a "Low G" coaster, where gravity is canceled out. When you're rocketing down the track, your body's momentum can cancel gravity and make you weightless, or it can combine and make you feel like you're made out of lead. A roller coaster engineer has to calculate out the forces that a rider would experience in all of the twists and turns, and has to carefully balance the line between safety and danger.

 

 

And the danger is real. A normal human body can usually withstand, on average, 5G until losing consciousness (a trained individual with expert equipment can withstand 9G), so a ride on the Takabisha is definitely not a walk-in-the-park. Some people have been recorded withstanding g-forces in the order of hundreds or even thousands, but that is only when the forces act for milliseconds. When the g-force acts on a body over a longer period of time, such as in a long loop of a roller coaster ride, the human body’s natural resistance to g-force plummets.

 

 

So your body is either floating or suddenly ten tons, and this can't be great for anyone's insides. The feeling of a stomach trying to escape out through your throat is universally understood, but at high G people can also experience a "grey out". This is when the eyes stop registering color properly due to the change of blood pressure in the head. If the change in pressure is even larger, then the final stage is G-LOC (loss of consciousness). Although sounding serious, this is a very rare effect at 4G, and stops immediately once the ride is over. Thrill seekers, eat your heart out.

 

 

Hiro Tamagatchi’s job is clear. How intense can he make a ride? Hiro has to decide precisely how many g-forces a person can withstand. He adds as many inversions and free fall drops as he can without putting anyone’s health in jeopardy. Too many, and the thrill seekers will be put off, too few and his success could become just another run of the mill kiddie-coaster. With this in mind, his masterpiece, the Takabisha, stands intimidatingly tall, giving people something few can experience and in way that could only be described as: fun.

 

Y.Z

Y.Z

Coasters make you

Color Blind.

GForce Analysis.

You are in a meeting. In fact, you just made a really impressive point. And now you are leaning back in your chair reveling in how completely original that insight was. Leaning back, leaning back. Your heels leave the floor. Leaning even further. You're only on your toes, leaning back.

 

Now, dear reader reading this article, you know exactly what's about to happen and already probably have a preemptive feeling deep down in your gut. That near-death experience that that person is about to undergo via tilting chair is called weightlessness. At best, you feel your organs shifting around. At worst, the change in pressure in your head makes your eyes stop registering color. It's actually pretty interesting, considering astronauts and jet fighter pilots experience that as a job. There is also this one guy who built a roller coaster to not just get you weightless, but actually in zero G.

 

What does zero G mean?

Let's talk about it!

 

This is a writing sample examining the design of an inverted roller coaster and using the experience of riding it to explain "G Force" and  it's effects.

My contribution:

Research

Writing

Enter the Takabisha:

Between Tokyo Drift and giant robots, Japan is a place that has a very loving attitude towards adrenaline and thrill. In that fashion, Hiro Tamagatchi created a $36 million roller coaster that is so steep that it's actually the steepest on the entire planet, or at least according to the people in the Guinness Book of World Records. The ride starts, going from 0 to 62.1 mph in 2 seconds (which is faster than any Ferrari), and swiftly flips around loop after loop for a total of 7 inversions. At this point, while the human brain is trying to unscramble those numbers, the ride flies up to a height of a 14 story building, and drops at an angle of 121 degrees. Careful readers will note that this in fact more than 90 degrees, and yes, it drops upside down, and when it does, everyone gets a few seconds in zero gravity.

Design in Zero G:

Hiro Tamagatchi has carefully measured out the design and made it so that the angle and speed at which the car enters the drop allow the rider to experience “near zero-g.” This means that riding on this roller coaster you can experience weightlessness. This happens when your movement cancels out gravity. So technically gravity is still there but you don't feel it anymore. Not counting NASA’s “Vomit Comet” which is primarily available to only astronauts, this is the only ride available that lets you experience zero gravity one moment, and then the crush of acceleration the next.

 

 

Although the effect is miraculous, Mr. Tamagatchi has created the roller coaster using simple concepts. The Takabisha is a steel roller coaster that uses linear motors and a rail system to drive the cars. This is similar to how a train is driven down a track. Although the linear motors apply the initial oomph, as well as carry individual cars up the slope to the top of the roller coaster, the main driving force is gravity. The roller coaster "falls" along the entire track. This is the important part to understand: even though the ride is moving because of gravity, instead of falling down, the ride is guided in a different direction by the track. This is what you feel.

 

 

The force that pins you back when the ride shoots off, and pushes you into your seat when you fly through an upside down turn are all caused by gravity. Or more accurately, the force created when your body is going in a direction other than where gravity wants you to go, otherwise known as g-force. Although g-forces act all around you, everywhere, they are mainly prevalent during moments of extreme acceleration when the g-forces increase to more the 2G.

 

Force to be reckoned with:

The Takabisha is considered a “High G” roller coaster, and during the crux of an inversion, a rider will undergo 4G, which are similar conditions to what a fighter pilot feels in a jet plane. It's also a "Low G" coaster, where gravity is canceled out. When you're rocketing down the track, your body's momentum can cancel gravity and make you weightless, or it can combine and make you feel like you're made out of lead. A roller coaster engineer has to calculate out the forces that a rider would experience in all of the twists and turns, and has to carefully balance the line between safety and danger.

 

 

And the danger is real. A normal human body can usually withstand, on average, 5G until losing consciousness (a trained individual with expert equipment can withstand 9G), so a ride on the Takabisha is definitely not a walk-in-the-park. Some people have been recorded withstanding g-forces in the order of hundreds or even thousands, but that is only when the forces act for milliseconds. When the g-force acts on a body over a longer period of time, such as in a long loop of a roller coaster ride, the human body’s natural resistance to g-force plummets.

 

 

So your body is either floating or suddenly ten tons, and this can't be great for anyone's insides. The feeling of a stomach trying to escape out through your throat is universally understood, but at high G people can also experience a "grey out". This is when the eyes stop registering color properly due to the change of blood pressure in the head. If the change in pressure is even larger, then the final stage is G-LOC (loss of consciousness). Although sounding serious, this is a very rare effect at 4G, and stops immediately once the ride is over. Thrill seekers, eat your heart out.

 

 

Hiro Tamagatchi’s job is clear. How intense can he make a ride? Hiro has to decide precisely how many g-forces a person can withstand. He adds as many inversions and free fall drops as he can without putting anyone’s health in jeopardy. Too many, and the thrill seekers will be put off, too few and his success could become just another run of the mill kiddie-coaster. With this in mind, his masterpiece, the Takabisha, stands intimidatingly tall, giving people something few can experience and in way that could only be described as: fun.